Monday, November 26, 2012

OF WILKERSON AND PETRAEUS

On Friday, November 16, four main stories were rotating frequently throughout the day: the early morning testimony of former CIA director Gen. David Petraeus, the rocket attacks from Gaza into Israel, the looming fiscal cliff and more information about the train crash in Midland, Texas, that killed four veterans the day before.

In 1976, David Wilkerson wrote Racing Toward Judgment.

Chapter 2: Judgment on America

The judgments of God come in dreadful succession. They are linked together in a chain, each one connected to the other.

So begins Wilkerson in his opening sentences. He then goes on to make 17 points about judgment, the last of which, point 17, speaks directly to this post.

An inevitable sign of judgment is the loss of national will and an unwillingness to defend against oncoming tides. Security systems are the first to fall, as in the days of King Belshazzar. While the leaders of the land, the business tycoons, the armed forces captains all drank and played, enemy armies were just outside the gate, unnoticed and undetected. No security guards, no spies, no warning system to let them know the enemy was diverting the river that protected them. Babylon’s security system broke down in the final hours of the empire.

And I will make drunk her princes, and her wise men, her captains, and her rulers, and her mighty men: and they shall sleep a perpetual sleep, and not wake, saith the King, whose name is the Lord of hosts. --Jeremiah 51: 57

Babylon was crushed because it lost its will to defend itself. Corrupted by ease and alcohol, the men became “as women” and sought only the comforts of home and the pleasures of the city. All defenses were broken down. She became weaker than her enemies: “Therefore shall her young men fall in the streets, and all her men of war shall be cut off in that day, saith the Lord” (Jeremiah 50:30).

December 8, 2011 -- President Obama showed just how much he had in common with the fallen Belshazzar when he took it upon himself to light the menorah even though it wasn’t Hanukkah and then jested to his guests, “And we never need an excuse for a good party.” His cute comment was followed by laughter from his guests.

Like Belshazzar why not take something that respectfully belongs in a synogogue or a Jewish home and use it to amuse some guests? Belshazzar lost his kingdom the night he pulled such a stunt; Obama did not. But it is not even a year later and we have all witnessed some very unusual events taking place among the upper ranks of our military.

Benghazi. Though this should be Obama’s Watergate, so far he has managed to stay above the fray and keep his hemline out of the muck. On the night of September 11, terrorists attacked our consulate in Libya and killed four Americans, including our ambassador to Libya.

We have seen all kinds of headlines and comments about Benghazi. Obama commented that Benghazi was a “bump in the road.”

One could suppose dead men lying in the road could be called that.

Multiple times over and in multiple venues, Obama blamed a barely-viewed YouTube uploaded sometime back in July by a “shady” character that supposedly insulted the prophet Muhammed. Drumming up a measure of indigation, Obama even stood at the podium at the U.N. and with tight lips declared that the “future does not belong to those who insult the Prophet.” (This begs the question of what he suggests should be done to those who do cast a slur.) He sent out our ambassador to the U.N. to five different Sunday morning talk shows to repeat carefully after him -- “It was a spontaneous reaction to a video.” Then, without warning, Obama claimed that he called the attack on the consulate a terror attack as quickly as the next day before going back to blaming a video again.

One can only look away and say, "What a circus."

The real problem with Benghazi is Petraeus. It looks like he fulfills what David Wilkerson was talking about. Wilkerson was telling us that in the final hours of an empire military leaders are unaware. They are taken with other matters, such as banqueting and the comforts of home. They are taken with pleasures of the flesh and sensual diversions. They are interested in parties and social activities.

And that is what brought down Petraeus. Rather than being focused on the enemy that was outside the gate, his attention was turned to that pretty young thing writing down the particulars of his rather important career. At some point pen and paper were laid aside and the book was no longer the more interesting topic in the room.

We know now that the affair had been uncovered some months past and was well known among top officials in the Obama administration. Every effort is being made to be as vague as possible as to when Obama himself knew of it. But what exposed the whole matter was a socialite, a woman who claimed she was receiving threatening emails warning her to stay away from Petraeus. The socialite is well known in Florida for hosting large parties to entertain the top brass in the military, and was a kind of hostess to a nearby military base. (Isn’t it interesting that the “Hostess” company has fallen at the same time?) When the email trail led to Petraeus’ biographer and then to Petraeus himself, collateral damage began to appear as it was discovered that a General Allen had sent an enormous number of emails (some accounts say 30,000) to the socialite, emails that were described as similar to phone sex.

With the affair now exposed, Petraeus resigned as director of the CIA. Allen, who had been on track to become the Supreme Commander of NATO, had to have his nomination put on hold.

But in the last few weeks, these aren’t the only men who have fallen. Within days after the attack in Benghazi, head of AFRICOM Commander Gen. Carter Ham was said to be “apprehended” and then “relieved” of his duties and replaced (though other accounts say he retired).

Swiftly following was Rear Admiral Charles M. Gaouette, commander of the USS Stennis aircraft carrier strike group – MidEast, who was also relieved of his command citing, “inappropriate leadership judgment.”

Toward the end of September, Brig. Gen. Jeffrey Sinclair was sent home from Afghanistan on charges that included forcible sodomy, possessing pornography and alcohol while deployed, engaging in inappropriate relationships, and misusing a government charge card.

Something is going on with the upper ranks of the military. William Koenig noted at his site that Petraeus’ fall could be of a divine result for some comments he made about Israel as well as his embracing of the repeal of DADT. Here is a partial screenshot.



It very well could be.

But the reason I noted David Wilkerson’s point #17 in the beginning of this post is because the title of the point is DOWN WITH THE CIA. Wilkerson was noting in his 17 points about judgments that come upon a land taken with her sins and who has forsaken God, the last point is that in her final moments, those in charge of her security, her top intelligence and military leaders, become taken with sensual matters and parties and cause the guard of the country to come down. Wilkerson saw the fall of the CIA.

. . . in the final moments of the empire

. . . leaders don't perceive the enemy.

I am not sure we can see any stronger representation of that very point than the fall of Petraeus. We have to remember that Petraeus wasn’t just director of the CIA, he was also Army. He was not originally an “intelligence” guy -- he was a field guy, a ground guy. In this regard, it seems he fulfills what Wilkerson was writing about -- the fall of our intelligence community as well as the fall of our military officers. And it is so sad that one of the most important men in our country was taken down not by an armed enemy or clever spy but a party hostess of lavish banquets.

As an additional confirmation it seems that several individuals, including Rep. Dana Rohrabacher (R-CA), have noted that President Obama, also Commander-in-Chief, seems unable to call terrorism terrorism.  Some of our members of Congress are concerned that Obama does not, or will not, recognize the enemy at the gate.

Thomas L. Friedman, writing an op-ed piece for the New York Times, notes that this scandal involving two of our top military and intelligence officers "could not be coming at a worse time."(1)

Writer Mark Steyn (a personal favorite of mine, btw) has even noted, without mentioning David Wilkerson, the distracting role of a party hostess in top military affairs. When the secular comments on the prophetic unaware, then perhaps we should take note and ask . . .

is Wilkerson right? Are we seeing the final moments of our empire?

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(1) Obama's Nightmare, Thomas L. Friedman, New York Times, November 13, 2012